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Banking on Friendship: Mercantile Language and Epicureanism in Horace's Odes Concerning Vergil

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dc.contributor.advisor Hejduk, Julia
dc.contributor.author Margheim, Stephen
dc.date.copyright 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2104/8373
dc.description.abstract During their own lifetime, Horace and Vergil were Rome’s two most celebrated living poets, and history relates that they were also friends. Unfortunately, little is known of their friendship, and few avenues exist by which to illumine its nature. In Horace's four books of Carmina, three such avenues exist: Odes 1.3, 1.24, and 4.12, and mercantile language is the leitmotif that unites them. Insofar as commercial language pervades these three odes, Horace creates a poetic triptych, a cohesive representation of a relationship cast against the history of Epicureanism. Through a careful reading of these three poems, I elucidate how the mercantile imagery reveals a friendship underpinned by Epicurean philosophy and practice. Horace holds that if we bank on friendship, it will always pay dividends. en_US
dc.rights Baylor University projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact libraryquestions@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.subject Horace. Epicureanism. Vergil. Mercantile Language. Odes. 1.3. 1.24. 4.12. Philodemus. Epicurus. Cicero. en_US
dc.title Banking on Friendship: Mercantile Language and Epicureanism in Horace's Odes Concerning Vergil en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.rights.accessrights Worldwide access en_US
dc.contributor.department University Scholars - Honors Program en_US


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