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Identity correlates of academic achievement : how influential are self, academic and ethnic identity statuses among college students?

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dc.contributor.advisor Saxon, Terrill F.
dc.contributor.author Fearon, Danielle Dierdre.
dc.date.copyright 2012-08
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2104/8541
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of different identity statuses on academic achievement among a sample of students attending a community college. There were three identities of interest: ego, academic and ethnic. Participants’ overall grade point average was used as the measure of academic achievement. Identity was conceptualized using the Eriksonian-Marcian theoretical approach with ego and academic identities having four statuses: (a) achieved, (b) foreclosed, (c) diffused and (d) moratorium. The ethnic identity had two statuses: (a) commitment (achieved) and (b) exploration. A total of 163 students participated in the study. The data were analyzed using a series of path analyses. Results revealed that in the ego identity model, the status with the strongest direct effect was the ego identity diffused status. In the academic identity model, the status with the strongest direct effect was the academic moratorium status. In the ethnic identity model, the statuses had similar direct effects on academic achievement. The academic moratorium identity emerged as the most salient identity status. The findings have implications for educators and students as to how identity impacts students’ performance in the classroom. en_US
dc.publisher en
dc.rights Baylor University theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. Contact librarywebmaster@baylor.edu for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.subject Identity. en_US
dc.subject Achievement. en_US
dc.subject Non-traditional Students. en_US
dc.title Identity correlates of academic achievement : how influential are self, academic and ethnic identity statuses among college students? en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.rights.accessrights Worldwide access. en_US
dc.rights.accessrights Access changed 1/14/14.
dc.contributor.department Educational Psychology. en_US
dc.contributor.schools Baylor University. Dept. of Educational Psychology. en_US


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